10 Steps to Your Next Promotion 10 Steps to Your Next Promotion

10 Steps to Your Next Promotion

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10 Steps to Your Next Promotion

by Nexlec 

Mar 23, 2018

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In today’s corporate world, it is becoming difficult to fast track your career. If you do not actively seek out a promotion, it is unlikely that your boss will offer it to you. It is important that you need to stay committed and know your worth if you want to secure your next career goal. 


Here are 10 steps you can take to help you move up the corporate ladder to where your skill level and dedication dictates you can be.  

 

Stay true to yourself 

Sometimes we recreate our persona and overpromise on what is asked of us as we think this will impress our superiors and co-workers. It becomes a tricky web to uphold as tasks are piling up, overloading you with unreasonable expectations. Not only is it exhausting, but those around us see only the targets we promised to, but don't hit or the jobs we hand in late – not the nights we stay late or the stress we put ourselves under. There is a lot to be said for going the extra mile but it is equally as important to know our reasonable limitations and work with our team from there to be as productive as you can be and deliver on promises made.   

 

Fulfil your current responsibilities well 

While we shouldn’t overpromise on our responsibilities, but we should also never under perform. You've taken the time to establish challenging but achievable goals with your team and it is important to work towards achieving those as best you can. Neglecting your workload will affect your chances of a promotion. If you fail to deliver, your superiors won’t be able to rate the quality of your performance positively, nor will they be able to see you as a reliable asset. 

 

Keep track of your achievements  

Some people think that their superiors will be fully aware of all their accomplishments in the company. That is not necessarily true, as they are overseeing multiples of people across the company and though certainly appreciative at the time of the work you deliver, it cannot be expected they recall everyone's achievements. 


If you are not receiving what you consider to be adequate recognition, there is no benefit in developing negative emotions towards your superiors. What you may consider their ignorance, could simply be their pre-occupation with more pressing issues.  


Keep track of your contributions and at your next review be bold enough to discuss these in co-ordinance with the progress you wish to achieve in the company. If you then find their perception of your value to be different from your own, you can clarify where they would like you to grow and improve rather than experiencing counterproductive negative energy towards your workplace and colleagues. 

 

Stay proactive 

Gaining a promotion means gaining more responsibilitiesYou’ll need to be able to take the lead without waiting for instructions from your superiors. Know when to exercise your initiative whenever possible so you can demonstrate to your supervisor that you are capable of working independently. 

 

Be an excellent team player 

While you may be tempted to get ahead of the pack, you should be aware that working closely with your team can bring in greater results for the company, which is what your boss is interested in.  

 

Become a great team player and work with your colleagues to reach your team’s objectives. You can offer to be a mentor to new co-workers, or help your colleagues with their workload if they are overwhelmed. 

 

Keep in mind that being a great team player also extends beyond the office, so make a point of socializing with your colleagues at events such as office parties, mixers, and conferences. 

 

Give solutions, not just problems 

When a problem arises, don’t just go running to your boss and expect him or her to fix it. Instead, you should assess the situation carefully, then propose any solutions you have in mind. By doing so, your boss will more likely appreciate your problem-solving skills and respect your intiative. 

 

Be professional 

To show that you deserve a promotion, you should conduct yourself professionally. These may seem like common sense thoughts but respect company policy, show up to work on time, dress well, be courteous towards others, maintain a positive attitude in the office, avoid office gossip, impress clients by going the extra mile. Simple, though how often do we come across co-workers who don't follow these instinctive concepts.  

 

Understand the requirements for a promotion 

It’s important that you know what qualities, skillsand experience the job you want requires. Organize a one-on-one session with your supervisor to discuss this. This is especially useful as it serves two purposes – not only can you acquire the information you need, you are also letting your boss know you’re interested in progressing. 

 

Find a mentor 

If you feel you do not have the adequate skills or experience, it is good to seek a good mentor who can advise you and guide your progress. You will be surprised how many experienced colleagues you may find who are more than happy to guide you. It simply comes back to the fact that humans enjoy giving back. Though they are doing you a favour, your appreciation and eagerness to learn would be enough of a reward. 

 

Develop and upgrade your professional skills 

As promotions are competitive, you’ll need to expand your skills and knowledge accordingly if you wish to progressDevote some time to catch up on trade literature, attend webinars and participate in online courses in order to enhance your career expertise. 

 

Move on 

If despite your best efforts, and after honest discussions with your superiors, you feel that there is no progress possible in your immediate or extended future, it may be best to seek an alternative where you feel you might be a better fit.  

 

Not to say that you are not currently enjoying your roll and work environment, but there are some instances where companies cannot afford further promotions of employees to senior levels. Despite both your and their best intentions, there may simply not be the scope for the advancement you require.  

 

Moving to an alternative work place under these circumstances can often be done amicably and with recommendations from your current employer.  

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